Call Us Today!
Chris Nelson
Peak Construction & Design, Inc.

760.668.3991

Testimonials
Here's what some of our clients have to say:

"You couldn't ask for a better or dependable contractor. Great work."

Brian & Lisa

"Thanks again for the excellent job you did on our condo....One of our friends who is a decorator commented on how well made and how nice everything looks."

Larry & Harriet

"This guy walks on water! Wonderful work."

John & Sue

Click here to view all of our testimonials!
News Topics
Associations
Palm Desert Chamber of Commerce
Better Business Bureau with our A+ Rating

READY TO REMODEL??

CHRIS NELSON, PEAK CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN IS ALSO COMING INTO THE BOOMING AGE.  IT IS TIME TO SETTLE DOWN AND MAKE THE HOME THAT YOU ARE LIVING IN COMFORTABLE FOR THE AGING YEARS.  CHRIS NELSON CAN HELP YOU  MAKE YOUR HOME THE HOME THAT YOU WILL SPEND THE LAST YEARS IN.  DO YOU NEED A RENOVATED KITCHEN, A BATHTUB, MORE DOORS, MORE LIGHTING AN OFFICE OR A BIGGER MASTER BEDROOM.  CALL US TODAY FOR MORE INFO.

 

THIS INFORMATION WAS PROVIDED BY:

http://www.customhomeonline.com/business/ready-to-remodel_2.aspx

Ready to Remodel

Industry experts agree that a mix of market conditions and personal choice will see seniors trending toward aging-in-place remodeling

The baby boomer generation is again poised to impact the housing market, this time with the full thrust of its punch intertwined with the financial solvency of its members’ kids. A report last month from the Washington, D.C.-based Bipartisan Policy Center found that while the housing bust is complicating the anticipated spike in the size of the senior population, to which it adds masses of boomers daily, the market’s fate is linked to the homeownership ability of a group it calls “Echo Boomers.” This younger demographic, often boomers’ children, emerged from the recession with diminished incomes and dwindling job prospects, leaving them more likely to pay a monthly rent than take out a mortgage on a home.

As analysts talk of home prices hitting bottom, and as an increasingly disproportionate number of home-owning seniors look to sell and downsize, first-time buyers may begin to scoop up these properties. But industry experts agree that for the time being, seniors outnumber young, mortgage-worthy buyers, pushing the latter to hold back. The report notes that by 2030, baby boomers will have added 30 million people to the senior population, at which point the segment will account for 20 percent of the overall U.S. population, with two-thirds of this group being older than 85 years. Nate Bergwrites for The Atlantic Cities that with 10,000 individuals in the U.S. turning 65 years old daily through 2020, where and how these seniors live will be important for monitoring shelter opportunities available to aging populations. The fact that the Echo cohort at best could add 18.8 million households on top of a 6.7 million household gain from other generational groups by 2020, according to the report, means the ball is in the remodelers’ court.

Rolf Pendall, the study’s co-author and director of the Metropolitan Housing & Communities Policy Center at the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C., says demand to match the caliber of senior-owned homes entering the market isn’t likely to pick up for another five to eight years. Meanwhile, seniors are turning to remodeling and retrofitting to make their homes compatible spaces for aging in place—a trend that represents a significant shift from the group’s historical impact on new construction, he says.

“The boomers have transformed the American housing markets since the day they were born,” Pendall says, noting the variations in structure types to which the lifestyle patterns of this massive group gave play—mass-produced housing post-World War II, the 1970s apartment boom, townhouses in the ’80s, and the McMansions of the following decade.

Stephen Melman, director of economic services at the NAHB, agrees. He’s found the aging-in-place dynamic—be it an outgrowth of market conditions or a conscious choice by home-owning seniors—to be pushing the design/build community to meet a need that’s not necessarily new but is poised for a larger audience in the coming years.

Emily Salomon, state and local policy coordinator at the Center for Housing Policy and a co-author of the recently published report, “Housing an Aging Population: Are We Prepared?”told CUSTOM HOME last week that 90 percent of older adults say they prefer to “age in place.” For seniors who can afford it, particularly in weaker housing markets, that preference opens the door for Pendall’s remodeling quotient and, with its potential size, presents a new angle on a seemingly overlooked market.

Melman says that approximately two-thirds of remodelers surveyed by the NAHB reported that they’re doing aging-in-place work; and by 2020, 45 percent of U.S. households will include a member who is at least 55 years old, he says. Seniors doing remodeling work often have equity in their existing homes and can finance projects that are energy efficient, accommodate space for a caregiver or visiting relatives, offer accessible design, and use quality building materials. And those who do move, he says, look for a smaller space and energy footprint.

“People rate the laundry room and linen closet right near the top, among the [home’s] top five features,” he says. “If you’re 65 years old, you want a well-organized laundry where you can reach the washer and dryer, maybe built up shelving, appropriately spaced recessed task lighting, and proper ventilation.”

Beyond grab bars and other fall-preventing devices, builders and remodelers should look to focus living on a single floor with minimal obstructions and also to improve the air quality of homes. “This is a potential untapped place for builders, architects, planners, and others to work in coalition to make sure local rules are favorable,” Pendall says.

But Salomon notes that one-third of older adults requiring accessibility-driven retrofits can’t afford to implement them. However, she adds that revisions to local building codes will offer more seniors the opportunity to age in place.

Small-scale adjustments across a broad, growing demographic could offer new larger-scale building opportunities should the market pick up and seniors sell their homes in favor of accessible communities and other facilities, says Dowell Myers, urban planning researcher and professor at the University of Southern California and a co-author of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s study. “Everybody recognizes that the only growth sector aside from young singles and apartments is the older folks and retirement housing,” he says. “What will get people out of their houses is if they can find some new package that doesn’t exist yet. Architects who can design a more supportive community … they’ll be successful in filling their units.”

Peak Construction & Design is a residential/light commercial, general building contractor licensed/insured in California. We specialize in remodeling of custom/single family homes, condominiums, light commercial offices, as well askitchen and bathroom remodeling, along with new built homes, barns and out buildings . We also do general home maintenance.  We service Southern California and the communities  including Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Cathedral City, Indian Wells, Palm Springs, La Quinta, CaliforniaPlease call Chris Nelson today at 760.668.3991!


 

Leave a Reply